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Fee Vs Free Webinars Is It Better To Give Or Receive

March 19th, 2018 Posted by Articles 0 thoughts on “Fee Vs Free Webinars Is It Better To Give Or Receive”

ADDITIONAL
CONTENT

We provide the best webinar platform and webinar hosting services.
Our clients receive the best webinar project management, webinar preparation,
webinar technology, and webinar production services on the market.

CLICK HERE FOR A FREE CONSULTATION

FEE VS FREE WEBINARS IS IT BETTER TO GIVE OR RECEIVE

“I’d like to charge for my webinars. I don’t want to do all this work and give it away!” -Firm Leader

A common question is: Should your prospects pay to attend a webinar? My answer, 95% of the time, is “no.” Hosting fee-based webinars counters the process of building and maintaining relationships and sacrifices long-term growth for short-term gain.

This weekend, I went for walk through Faneuil Hall in downtown Boston. (Non-residents may know it as Quincy Market.) To take refuge from the not-so-appealing outdoor walking weather, I entered the large historic building which represents our rich heritage and is now filled with a…food court.

What does this have to do with webinars? It’s an eye-opening scene that we’re all familiar with. The vendors that understand how people purchase have employees in the walking area offering free samples.

Guess which vendors had the longest lines?

THE EFFECT OF FEES ON ATTENDANCE

Let’s look at the math from real examples of an existing client who marketed two separate webinars to their list:

If you want to grow your service firm, do not charge for webinars.

At Rally Point, we look at webinars as a tactic that supports long-term growth. It begins and strengthens relationships with prospects. With that mindset, the more people you reach, the more robust growth your firm will realize in the long-term.

THE VALUE OF REGISTRANTS AND ATTENDEES

To keep things simple, let’s treat registrants at free and fee-based webinars equally.

(Arguments can be made that fee-paying attendees are more serious and should carry more weight. An argument can also be made that fee-paying attendees are looking to learn from the webinar so they can do something themselves. Hence, they should be weighted less. We’re going to keep them equal.)

What happens after the webinar?

Registrants have indicated their interest in your expertise and presentation topic. Those who attended (live or recorded) have begun developing a trust in your firm and its speaker(s).

Leverage that budding trust and clear interest by inviting registrants to one-on-one conversations. Ask them if they would like to talk about the webinar topic and the specifics of their situation.

Research from RainToday.com shows that, among those who download white papers or register for webinars, there is a standard breakdown of short-term and long-term leads. That is, if you can get prospects aware of you and identify their interest in specific topics, you can expect a portion of them to buy related services in the short and long term.

The breakdown:

That means 75% of the people that register for your event will be purchasing related services within two years. That’s a big percentage! And it’s exactly why fast growing, successful companies like Leads360, HubSpot, and Citrix all do free, not fee, based webinars.

These fast growing firms understand that to achieve long-term, significant growth you have to get in front of prospects with your thought leadership. You have to provide some free samples to get more prospective clients lining up.

Putting a fee on the webinar is a barrier to getting your expertise in front of as many prospects as possible. It’s as if you’re asking for fifty cents for a bite of chicken before they buy a $7 entrée at the food court. While some might pay, you will generate a lot more interest if you give it away.

THE LONG-TERM VALUES OF FEE VS. FREE WEBINARS

Pretend your firm is going to run a webinar. You have a mailing list of 6,000 and the team is trying to decide whether or not to charge for the event. Try looking at the potential outcome of both a free and fee webinar. For this scenario, the average client worth (lifetime) for your firm is $20,000:

Is the above table a simplistic view? Yes. Does it illustrate the long term value of free webinars? Yes!

THE FINAL ANALYSIS

Free webinars offer a zero-risk way for prospects to indicate their interest in a specific topic (need) and provide their contact information to a related service provider (your firm). Free webinars also generate more leads, conversations, and opportunities compared to fee-based webinars.

Free webinars will contribute far more to your firm’s long-term growth.

5 Keys To Building Relationships During Online Events

March 19th, 2018 Posted by Articles 0 thoughts on “5 Keys To Building Relationships During Online Events”

ADDITIONAL
CONTENT

We provide the best webinar platform and webinar hosting services.
Our clients receive the best webinar project management, webinar preparation,
webinar technology, and webinar production services on the market.

CLICK HERE FOR A FREE CONSULTATION

5 KEYS TO BUILDING RELATIONSHIPS DURING ONLINE EVENTS

Your firm’s survival depends on having sales conversations with the right people. Webinars offer an opportunity to have them. The attendees are people whom you targeted and who told you—by registering—they want to spend an hour listening to you.

And what do most firms do? They practically ignore each person. They might say hello to the group, but rarely does anyone ask an attendee what he or she thought.

Consider how someone usually interacts with a speaker or company during a webinar. He or she:

  1. Receives a marketing email and registers.
  2. Receives a confirmation email with login instructions.
  3. Receives a reminder email or two.
  4. Watches the live presentation.
  5. Receives a thank you email with access to the slides and on-demand recording.

Many prospects can register, show up, and disappear without anyone every communicating with them one-on-one.

This fact does not diminish the effectiveness of webinars. (Most companies run them this way and say they are an unqualified success.) Rather, it means most companies could lift the effectiveness of their webinars to new heights.

Here are five actions you can take to interact one-on-one with attendees, initiate more conversations, and form new client relationships.

#1 ASK FOR QUESTIONS AHEAD OF TIME

One goal of your webinar presentation is to provide as much value to your attendees as possible. What better way to discover what registrants want than the ask them.

Action Item: Email each registrant with the main points of the presentation. Ask each person, “Which one(s) would you like me to focus on?” Or, “What questions would you like me to address in greater detail.” Track the results by individual.

(Read on to see how to leverage this information.)

#2 INITIATE CHATS DURING THE WEBINAR

Attendees usually communicate with the webinar speaker(s) and moderator by chatting. Usually a number of them do. But most do not.

The ones who do chat have their own concerns addressed directly by the speaker. These same people typically give the webinar a higher rating in the exit surveys and are more inclined to having follow-up conversations.
Your job then is to create more chats.

Action Item: Assign several knowledgeable people to start chats with every webinar attendee. Have nearby their replies to the question email (cited above) if possible. Ask the attendees what they think. Ask them for details about their business. Ask them why they joined the webinar.

Some of these conversations will bloom: Attendees may share their needs and aspirations and may agree to a phone conversation with the speaker at a later date.

#3 USE WEBINAR HANDOUTS

Most presentations are one-way communications. The speaker speaks and the listener listens. More good things happen when presentations become interactive. Webinar handouts are another way to do this.

Action Item: Send attendees a handout or worksheet before the webinar and build in work for attendees to do during the webinar.

This could be questions they have to answer or a checklist they need to complete. At the very least, it keeps them focused on the webinar (and not on their inbox). And it often leaves attendees with something of physical value and leaves you with a good conversation topic if you reach them later.

#4 HAVE AN EXIT SURVEY

You felt you did a great job delivering the webinar presentation. What did the audience think? Most speakers cannot answer with certainty because they never asked.

Action Item: Create an exit survey and give the URL to attendees before the webinar is over. It lets them rate their experience and give open-ended answers to what they liked and didn’t like. The survey provides you with invaluable information about the reactions of each individual.

(Note, more attendees will take an exit survey if it is offered at the beginning of the Q&A and not at the end of the webinar.)

#5 MAKE FOLLOW-UP PHONE CALLS

Have someone call every attendee and registrant after the webinar. Ask them how it went and inquire about their exit survey comments and any other information you have.

Calling always makes a difference. For instance, a three-dimensional mailer campaign we executed received a 1% response rate. That response rose to 10% when the firm called each recipient. It isn’t the job of the prospect to call you if they are interested. It’s their job to be interested when you reach them by phone.

Action Item: Call every attendee within 48 hours. Call every registrant within 96 hours. (They’ll usually be happy to hear from your company.)

Talk with Your Guests

When you invite friends over for a dinner party, you ask them what they might like to eat beforehand; you talk to them during the event; you have fun things for them to do; you say good night; and you speak with them a day or two later to find out how their evening went. You absolutely call friends who said they would come, but then had to cancel.

Do the same thing with your webinar attendees and registrants! Ask them what appeals to them ahead of time (offer areas of interest). Provide them with something to do (give a handout). Start a conversation (initiate a chat). Ask them how the evening went (provide an exit survey). And call them later to talk about the evening and schedule other events (make a follow-up phone call).

You want your prospects to become clients. Talking with them only helps.

Keeping Good Webinars From Looking Bad

March 19th, 2018 Posted by Articles 0 thoughts on “Keeping Good Webinars From Looking Bad”

ADDITIONAL
CONTENT

We provide the best webinar platform and webinar hosting services.
Our clients receive the best webinar project management, webinar preparation,
webinar technology, and webinar production services on the market.

CLICK HERE FOR A FREE CONSULTATION

KEEPING GOOD WEBINARS FROM LOOKING BAD

My business partner Patrick recently asked a group on LinkedIn how many bad webinars they’ve seen. One gentleman wrote: “Asking me how many bad webinars I’ve seen is like asking me how many hangovers I’ve had in college.”

Blunt, painful, but true. There are more and more webinars out there (as more and more marketers embrace them as a highly-effective, lead generation tactic). That means more good ones and more bad ones.

How do you demonstrate that yours is one of the good ones? And once a prospect registers, how do you fulfill on that promise?

It’s a challenge. Here are some actions you can take to meet it.

PRE-WEBINAR PODCAST

Unless you have Steven Spielberg, Katie Couric, or Nelson Mandela speaking at your webinar, a speaker’s name will rarely increase registrations. If not their name, what about their voice? Can you use it to establish their bona fides as a presenter?

Does your speaker have a charming British accent or endearing Texas twang or speak with genuine gusto? Your prospective attendees would love to know.

Does the speaker talk to listeners’ needs? Does he or she make the material relatable? Prospective attendees would like to know if the speaker is not only knowledgeable, but also relevant and instructive.

As a writer, I believe in the power of written words. Still, they rarely replace a person’s voice.

Your Assignment: Create a pre-webinar podcast. This is a 3-4 minute audio recording. It has an (anonymous) host who introduces the webinar topic and speaker and who asks some concise questions, such as:

  • How will this webinar improve the performance of its attendees?
  • What is the most common misconception attendees bring to this topic?
  • Can you explain how one or two specific companies or individuals have benefited from this material?
  • What is the number one reason listeners will want to register for this event?

The speaker then has space to advise, joke, teach, share, explain, and story-tell. Add some bumper music to the beginning and end and you have yourself a podcast.

The business people you invite to your webinar can now form an instant impression of the speaker and can sign up with the confidence (presumably) that your webinar’s speaker will be a good one.

ONE-TO-ONE CONVERSATIONS

Imagine sitting at your dining room table. Your friend is prepping you for a statistics exam—except he is speaking from behind a tabletop podium, projecting into a microphone, looking past you, and talking to an imaginary crowd.

This is how I feel listening to most webinars. I’m at my desk trying to learn something and the voice coming through my speakers isn’t talking to me.

I feel this way because webinar speakers typically make the mistake of speaking to webinar attendees the same way they speak to an in-person seminar group. But with webinars, there is no group.

The speaker is talking to attendees who, for the most part, are listening alone at their desks. While a webinar may have 50-200 attendees listening, the speaker is having 50-200 one-on-one conversations.

Your Assignment: Have someone sit across from the webinar speaker while they present. Have the speaker talk to that person. Why? It is that one-on-one dynamic that works best and that you want to create.

As one example benefit, the speaker would have to speak in first and second person, using “you” and “I” or “we.” Adobe’s white paper, Leveraging Multimedia for Learning, explains why this is so powerful:

Have you ever been in a conversation when someone asks you a question and you realize you have not heard much of what was said? All of us feel embarrassed when we are caught not attending to someone talking to us.

This social convention is the basis for… “the personalization principle.” According to this idea, learning is better when participants in eLearning feel they are engaged in a conversation.

To engage your learners in a social experience, use informal… first and second person language.… [We’ve] found that just a few simple changes in language that involved adding “you” and “we” pronouns resulted in dramatic improvements in learning.

The reason is that at an unconscious level, we tend to process more deeply when we are in a social-like setting.

Another benefit of delivering a webinar in front of another person is that the speaker talks at the proper volume, instead of overly projecting.

This happened in a pre-webinar technical check I recently did. When I had a conversation with the presenter during the tech check, the volume was fine because we were talking one-on-one.

Once the webinar went live, I had to re-adjust a number of audio settings because the speaker was talking much louder (and causing distortion) because he thought he was speaking to a large group and no longer to just one person.

BE SPECIFIC

Marketers, executives, and practitioners want to learn something at your webinar. They want to leave with specific actions they can take to improve their performance.

Strategy, philosophy, and bulleted best practices provide nice-to-knows but not happy-to-haves. Specific examples, case studies, exercises, and stories provide the juicy material people remember.

After listening to John Verry of Pivot Point Security in an on-demand webinar, I have added dialogue as another item to the being-specific list.

“Leveraging Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP) to Reduce Web App Data Breach Risk” is not a topic I had heard of or cared anything about. (It relates to server security.) Yet he had me deeply interested in it by using dialogue. Here is what I mean:

John didn’t give me the big picture, or the result, or an overview. John took me word-for-word through his thinking process as it happened with a client.

I could visualize the conversation. I heard first hand his line of thinking and the problems companies create for themselves. It was as riveting as OWASP could ever be for me and I will now hire Pivot Point Security if I ever have a data breach problem.

Your Assignment: The adage for selling professional services is show don’t tell. Sampling a conversation you had with a client powerfully shows webinar attendees how you think and perform in action.

Talk with a colleague about some really helpful exchanges you’ve had with a client or two. Jot notes of how that conversation unfolded word-by-word. You’ll then have material to use in a webinar that will be as powerful as John’s. Just be sure you use it.

POLISH YOUR SILVER

The promise of 40-pound silver bars lured Spanish treasure ships across oceans hundreds of years ago. Relevant, instructive content is the most enticing marketing offer a professional service firm can provide to its prospective clients. Make sure you display your content properly so that your prospects know how good it is and go after it.

How To Powerfully Connect With Your Audience

March 19th, 2018 Posted by Articles 0 thoughts on “How To Powerfully Connect With Your Audience”

ADDITIONAL
CONTENT

We provide the best webinar platform and webinar hosting services.
Our clients receive the best webinar project management, webinar preparation,
webinar technology, and webinar production services on the market.

CLICK HERE FOR A FREE CONSULTATION

HOW TO POWERFULLY CONNECT WITH YOUR AUDIENCE

PowerPoint presentations can be repulsively boring or beautifully engaging. Which way a slide deck falls makes a big difference for the presenter, especially in a business setting.

Business presentations have consequences. In a best-case scenario, the outcome of a presentation may be the approval of a six-figure contract or the go-ahead for a project to move forward. In a worst-case scenario, the presentation may result in lost income or professional respect: “That was a lousy presentation. I don’t understand what he was thinking!”

When I see a presentation that is effective and actually moves me, I share it in this feature and highlight why it stood out.

The Presentation Slides

The three slides selected for this month’s featured presentation* stood out because they perfectly embody a number of presentation principles: interactivity, beauty, and emotion (three words that rarely arise in the often staid realm of PowerPoint presentations).

 

 

 

 

 

Interactivity: Presentations are often monotonous. One person talks on-and-on-and-on, blah-blah-blah, while the audience watches and listens. Break things up. Add a do-it-yourself exercise.

Slide 1 transitions the lecture part of the recording to the viewer-exercise part. Slides 2 and 3 invite the audience to recall positive and negative experiences and note elements of them. The particulars of the exercise are unimportant. What’s noteworthy is that the exercise has the viewer engage the material and make it personal. And, if viewers had been checking their email during the lecture, they are now paying full attention.

Your Assignment: Review your presentation. Ask yourself, “What short exercise can the audience do (with no prep work)?” Rehearse it with colleagues to perfect it. Then use it live.

Beauty: People like looking at beautiful things. Go beyond Microsoft ClipArt and stock photos. Make your slides beautiful and hold the audience’s attention by including art.

The effective use of art in these slides is undeniable. The golden face in slide 1 is stunning and grabs attendees’ attention. The next images add life to slides which otherwise would have been—yawn—black-and-white text.

The three images could proudly hang on anyone’s wall. The bottom line is each image is attention grabbing and makes the slides a more valuable part of the audio/visual presentation.

Your Assignment: At each slide, note what emotion, image, or idea you are discussing or trying to convey. Visit museum and gallery websites to find, collect, and use images that correspond to your slides (copyright permitting).

Emotion: In sales conversations, good salespeople ask prospective buyers what problems pain them. Pain is not an abstract thing. Employees hate slow servers; marketers dislike poor product descriptions; executives dislike chasing current clients for unpaid invoices. A smart salesperson taps into that emotion to add urgency and desire to a proposal. Smart presenters use emotion to their advantage too.

The above presentation does not abstractly talk about happiness. It directly asks the viewers to re-experience positive and negative states. The presentation is much more powerful because of that.

Your Assignment: What emotional realities does your presentation conjure up? Does it address frustrating content management systems or the excitement of creating a steady sales pipeline. Invite attendees to consider the physical frustration or the reduced morale of using a slow system. Invite them to imagine the excitement of knowing sales goals are always within reach because the company has a never-ending queue of prospective buyers.

The Bottom Line

Lest anyone doubt the power of these three principles, consider the case of Stanford University. They wanted to raise one billion dollars from their alumni to fund an undergraduate program. What they did to accomplish this, in partnership with Creative Realities, Inc (CRI), was unheard of: They created a traveling-amphitheater, fundraising show.

While the show did not use PowerPoint, it did execute the three presentation principles to brilliant effect in another medium. For interactivity, the alumni sat around intimate dinner tables and talked about their time at Stanford and the substance of the evening’s brief, live speeches. For beauty, the show played a musical score, done at George Lucas’ Skywalker Ranch, and surrounded alumni with memorable elements of Stanford’s campus, including archways, rooftops, statues, and trees.

According to the CRI case study, the production ultimately triumphed because it beautifully executed the third presentation principle: “[It] would engage the alums by emotionally reconnecting them [emphasis added] to the university. The audience, each of whom got their start in life at Stanford, would become overwhelmed with pride, as they experienced the sensations of being Stanford students once more.”

The show surpassed expectations, raising over 1.2 billion dollars.

While interacting with your audience, emotionally connecting with them, and using art to enhance your audio/visuals may not earn you a billion dollars, doing so may earn you a six-figure client contract instead.

*The three slides, which come from a Landmark Education seminar session on “Creating Happiness,” are part of an educational presentation for people of all ages and backgrounds.

How To Assemble Parts Into An Excellent Presentation

March 19th, 2018 Posted by Articles 0 thoughts on “How To Assemble Parts Into An Excellent Presentation”

ADDITIONAL
CONTENT

We provide the best webinar platform and webinar hosting services.
Our clients receive the best webinar project management, webinar preparation,
webinar technology, and webinar production services on the market.

CLICK HERE FOR A FREE CONSULTATION

HOW TO ASSEMBLE PARTS INTO AN EXCELLENT PRESENTATION

Mr. Potato Head and your webinar presentation do have something in common. They both have a distinct structure. If you know what the structure is, you can be more effective at assembling them into a final, (fun,) quality product.

Let’s look at some presentation structures and how to go about creating them.

THE OPENING

You have a vision for what you want to accomplish with your webinar presentation. In less than 90 seconds, share it in a compelling way. Paint a picture for where you will take attendees by the end of the hour. You can tell a story, share research figures, or have each attendee recall a past experience.

On the flip side, each attendee has a unique reason for joining. What do they want to accomplish? What pain do they want to alleviate? What benefit do they want to arrive at? Ask each attendee to write on paper what their specific reasons for attending are.

This works to hold a person’s attention throughout the event. If they start to tune out or check their email, they can look down at the paper, get present or become mindful again of what they want, and refocus on what you’re saying with renewed interest.

THE MEAT

I see “10 Mistakes,” “Five Best Practices,” “Seven-Must Dos” as the most common structure for presentations. That’s often the easiest way for a presenter to create a presentation. However, it often isn’t what’s most helpful for attendees. These alternate structures can work really well.

Step-by-Step: Most people want to improve their performance after watching a webinar. They want to market more effectively, project-manage better, or write software faster. These actions happen in real-time in a linear process.

Structure the presentation around that chronology. Overlay the best practices across a timetable. This helps attendees to understand the practical use of the material and anticipate how they will apply it.

The above slide, from PM College’s presentation, “A 5-Step Process Linking Project Management Competency to Improved Business Performance,” does just that. This was the concluding slide after “Measure Improvement.” The presentation initially displayed just the first arrow and then added the others one-by-one after elaborating on each point.

• From Context to Concept to Reality: Sometimes the presenter has a model or concept to share. In this example presentation, “Building a Value Proposition that Sells in a Recession,” Paul Collins, Managing Partner at Equiteq, LLP, shared a model for building value propositions that receive premium pricing in a down market.

He set the context for this important element by reviewing the essential elements of a professional services firm, before isolating one—the value proposition—and discussing it:

As the webinar progressed, he discussed each tier of his model and then provided real-world examples of how to climb the pyramid to get to value creation. He did an excellent job and—with some help from a British accent—he made it must-see material.

Consider whether your presentation centers on a key model. If it does, this structure will serve you well.

• Make the Argument: Put on your Johnny Cochran shoes for this one. If you have a point to make, you can structure your presentation in whatever way makes the most compelling argument. You can fill it with drama and flair, numbers-backed evidence, logical analysis or anything else.

In this example, Leads360 provides Lead Management Software (LMS) that compliments Customer Relationship Management (CRM) systems. Their LMS produces terrific results for realtors, colleges, and brokers, but it’s not well known and can be viewed as unnecessary.

Leads360 made a compelling argument in the presentation title itself: “Where Good CRMs go Bad.” Their point was that while CRMs are good, they do have their shortcomings. Certain companies need a focused, specialized, and straightforward tool for critical tasks, like converting leads to sales.

As an example of flair and fun, the above slide brought a unique perspective to the point: Specialists produce better results—just look at the Track & Field world records. Not a single world record is held by a decathlete. Specialists hold each one.

• Give a Taste and Show How It’s Done: My friend Mark Levy, author of “Accidental Genius: Revolutionize Your Thinking Through Private Writing,” delivered a terrific webinar on writing compelling case studies. His case studies are like no one else’s. Before fully going into how to create them, he gave the audience a sample of what compelling case studies look like.

The above slide and story, along with a number of others, made the case. Once you were hooked on wanting one for your own business, Mark walked through the linear process of how to create them.

The Finish

Most presenters give a summary and then hold a question-and-answer session. Do the Q&A first. This lets you end on a powerful note instead of with an unpredictable (or planted) final question.

For the summary, restate what your compelling vision was and have the audience look down at their reasons for joining. Return them to what brought them to the presentation. Then, in the final minute, recap what you covered and paint a picture of what’s now possible for them after having spent an hour with you.

Moving Forward

A blank slide deck can be frustrating and time-consuming. Knowing what structures are available to you can make it easier to create your presentation. Kids don’t worry about playing with a Mr. Potato Head. They pop on a hat, eyes, ears, arms, and shoes. You can now do the same.

Fun And Ease Creating Your Webinar Presentation

March 19th, 2018 Posted by Articles 0 thoughts on “Fun And Ease Creating Your Webinar Presentation”

ADDITIONAL
CONTENT

We provide the best webinar platform and webinar hosting services.
Our clients receive the best webinar project management, webinar preparation,
webinar technology, and webinar production services on the market.

CLICK HERE FOR A FREE CONSULTATION

FUN AND EASE CREATING YOUR WEBINAR PRESENTATION

Many professionals feel anxious about creating webinar presentations. Others toil to create the world’s best or dash it together in a last-minute frenzy. Almost everyone wants to improve or be more at ease.

Regardless of your situation, the good news is: you can improve your online presentation—and even make the creative process fun—if you break it into doable steps, set accurate expectations, and know the elements that make them effective.

TIMELINE

Set a date for the live event and then work backwards to create deadlines for yourself. A realistic timeline might be:

  • 0-3 Days Out: Practice as much as you need to feel prepared and polished.
  • 3-7 Days Out: Have at least one dry run of your presentation with one or more colleagues and make the necessary adjustments.
  • 7-10 Days Out: Finalize your slide deck as well as your bulleted script.
  • 10-17 Days Out: Have an outline complete and the material in place for creating a professional presentation.
  • 17-21 Days Out: Brainstorm ideas, conduct research, and talk with colleagues about possible topics and then pick one.

Make these commitments to at least two other people. That will help hold you accountable for completing each step, on time.

When you create this timeline, keep in mind that everything will take longer when more than one or two people are involved. The concerns and contributions of marketers, designers, editors, and management can all lengthen the process.

SET YOUR MOOD

Before picking a topic or putting a word down, get yourself excited and feel confident and satisfied. Professionals are devoting one hour of their busy day to hear what you have to say. You know something about something they care about. They believe you can help. And they want you to succeed. They’re pulling for you.

Have You Really Done it: The fool’s mistake here is to spend only a few seconds on this step. “Yeah, I get it. People want to hear me.” Really keep the context of the presentation at heart when you create it. Your resulting openness, attentiveness, humor, and level of engagement will come across to the audience. It’s the difference between a flight attendant giving safety instructions and a coach showing you how to fly a plane.

GETTING TO WORK

Pick Your Topic: Look at what content previously drew the most interest for your target audience. Pick roughly that as your subject.

Within that, freely choose what areas you want to cover. It usually works best to pick an area that you’re passionate about, that is clear, and has a straightforward way for you to present it.

As a litmus test, give yourself 15-30 seconds to explain the presentation to someone who knows little about the topic. If they can explain it back to you to your satisfaction, you probably have a winner. If not, keep working at it. Fuzzy topics ultimately make for hard-to-understand webinars and ones that take too long to prepare and are a pain to deliver.

Make a Promise: At the end of the presentation, what will attendees leave with? What lessons will they have learned? What information will they now know? What case studies will they have seen? Get clear on what the final result of your webinar will be.

With college papers, it’s a thesis. For webinars, it’s your promise to the attendee that you will accomplish x, y, and z within the given hour.

Get It All Down: A common misconception (or lazy practice) is using the first draft as the final presentation (less some tweaking).

Write down on honest-to-goodness paper everything you want to say. Somehow pen and paper lead to greater creativity than a keyboard. You can draw arrows, map out ideas, doodle, and jot material in the margins. Its freeform nature often leads to surprising ideas or connections.

Include what your thoughts are, what experiences you went through to get where you are, examples of work you’ve done, images that come to mind, and any stories you would share.

The goal here is to figure out what you think about the topic, now that you’re really thinking about it. As Joan Didion, the celebrated author, put it, “I don’t know what I think until I write it down.”

If you’re stuck on what to say, imagine a situation in which you’d naturally explain the material. If you were coaching a client one-one-one, what would you say? If you were taking over a project, what actions would you take? Putting yourself in a real-world situation can get the content flowing.

Organize What Your Wrote: Getting it all down is a messy experience. Now that it’s there, organize what you wrote into key categories, the major elements of your presentation. Sort the material by which element it belongs to.

Look back at “the promise” you made. Have you delivered on it? Is there any information that does not connect to it? Let those questions guide your editing process. If the material is extraneous, cut it. If the material doesn’t fully deliver on the promise, bulk it up.

In addition to “the promise” guiding your presentation, also think about how to structure the presentation in a way that is easiest for someone else to learn. Usually telling the audience your conclusions—going over what you know—isn’t the most helpful thing. You got to where you are one experience at a time. It can help to take attendees through (a simplified version of) that journey so they too can learn what you know. By showing them the mistakes you’ve made or other options you’ve considered, they can see how you got to where you are.

TAKE IT AWAY

These steps will give you the time and structure to more easily create a presentation and provide the space to have more fun doing it. The goal is that you’ll enjoy sharing what you know in a way that really engages and helps other people so that they’ll come back for more.

5 Webinar Guidelines Professionals Cant Afford To Forget

March 19th, 2018 Posted by Articles 0 thoughts on “5 Webinar Guidelines Professionals Cant Afford To Forget”

ADDITIONAL
CONTENT

We provide the best webinar platform and webinar hosting services.
Our clients receive the best webinar project management, webinar preparation,
webinar technology, and webinar production services on the market.

CLICK HERE FOR A FREE CONSULTATION

5 WEBINAR GUIDELINES PROFESSIONALS CANT AFFORD TO FORGET

You are probably a presentation pro if you’re delivering a marketing webinar. Guidelines for how to prepare may seem unnecessary: One presenter wrote, “Telling me to prepare before an event is like telling Sinatra to warm up.”

Such opinions outstanding, professionals can benefit from a reminder on what to do. Here are four webinar preparation guidelines that will serve you well regardless of your level of skill or experience.

#1: PREPARING THE PRESENTATION

Most marketing webinars run 60 minutes and include a 15-minute Q&A session. The Q&A session will take care of itself. That leaves you with a 45-minute presentation to focus on.

For the visual element, you will need to create a PowerPoint presentation. Every quality presentation contains some key items. They are:

  • A company branded template: The classic poor presentations have an all white background or use a generic background that PowerPoint provides. You will want to create one that features your company logo and design elements that integrate your company colors.Here is an example of a quality one from the lead management company Leads360:
  • Visuals: PowerPoint presentations should never feature slide after slide of text. Include as many pictures, fun images, cartoons, graphs and charts as you can.The “Insert SmartArt” feature in PowerPoint 2007 is a life saver. This feature creates three-dimensional, colorful, well-designed graphs and charts of all types from within a drop-down menu. It means you spend 90 minutes on work that would ordinarily take a designer a day or two to complete.Another important visual key is to avoid showing a single slide for more than 60 seconds. The only exception to this is if you “build” or animate your presentation so that new information appears on a slide.The end result means your deck should have between 25-40 slides.
  • Polls: Audiences love it when they can interact with the presenter. That’s why Q&A sessions follow most every webinar.Polls offer presenters a fun way to interact with the audience during the presentation. It can only help to use 1-4 polls in a 45-minute presentation.A side benefit of polls is that they glean information about the audience. You can ask attendees what topic you should devote more time to or find out if most of the attendees are solo practitioners or work for large firms. Attendees can then savor your presentation as you tailor it to their needs.
  • Audio: Your voice will accompany the visuals. And just as pictures spice up a presentation, so too do stories and anecdotes. These convey information more powerfully than reading a list of bullets. They keep your audience listening and are often the most memorable part of a webinar.Finally, never read from a script. It makes a live presentation lifeless and, well, scripted. (Think Ferris Bueller’s Day Off: “Bueller, Bueller, Bueller.”)If you need notes, the best thing to do is to have a list of bulleted talking points you want to cover for each slide. They will ensure you cover everything and will give you the space to deliver your lines with the spark of spontaneity.

#2: HAVING THE PROPER MOTIVATION

Marketing webinars work best when they position the presenter as a knowledgeable and objective resource who delivers educational content. That approach is ruined when the presenter promotes his or her company’s services or products. It turns an informational event into an advertorial.

Leave any overt marketing to the moderator. The moderator can promote the company at the beginning and end of the webinar.

There are two exceptions. It is okay to share information about yourself, your company, and your work if the goal is to educate attendees. It is also okay to briefly mention your research, writings, etc., if it is to provide attendees with a citation.

#3: KNOW WHO YOU’RE SPEAKING TO

You can have the best presentation in the world, but it won’t work if you deliver it to the wrong audience. Imagine Michael Jordan showing a synchronized swimming team how to take a jump shot. Audience information you want before creating a presentation includes:

  • Titles
  • Firm sizes
  • Industries
  • Areas of focus
  • Age range

If you are delivering a presentation for another company, make sure to look at their list demographics.

#4: CAREFULLY PICK WHAT YOU PUT IN THE SPOTLIGHT

The best webinars usually have a strong focus. In thinking about how to structure your presentation, first choosing a single question you’d like to answer for attendees. Some examples might include:

  • How do I have my webinar attendees leave this presentation knowing what rules they need to follow to turn customers into clients?
  • How do I have my webinar attendees leave this presentation knowing how to best use LinkedIn to generate new business?

Anything in the presentation that doesn’t answer the core question can get cut.

#5: PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE

Improvisational theater does not make for good webinars. Always practice delivering your presentation several times. It gives you the time you need to work out any kinks, get comfortable with the delivery, and add any finishing touches.

Professionally Done

A webinar presentation has many elements to it. These five guidelines will give you a solid framework to work from. Remember, while Frank Sinatra was a great professional, even he could not afford to sing off key.

Assembling Your Crack Webinar Team

March 19th, 2018 Posted by Articles 0 thoughts on “Assembling Your Crack Webinar Team”

ADDITIONAL
CONTENT

We provide the best webinar platform and webinar hosting services.
Our clients receive the best webinar project management, webinar preparation,
webinar technology, and webinar production services on the market.

CLICK HERE FOR A FREE CONSULTATION

A WEBINAR SELF ASSESSMENT GUIDE

You want to know how good your webinar was. After all, an audience that your company wants to impress just saw it. While the dozens or hundreds of attendees couldn’t see how well the speaker was dressed, they were definitely evaluating certain aspects of your live event.

From the audience’s perspective: How engaging was the content? Was there superior audio quality? Did the visuals complement the presentation? From an internal perspective: How well did you market the webinar? Is your firm ready to follow up with each registrant?

These sorts of questions fall nicely into five categories. Answer the questions in each of the categories below for a sense of where your events sparkle and where they need some shine.

Your event impressed guests one way or the other before it ever started. How the webinar invitations looked, what they said, and when they were sent gave invited guests the material they needed to judge whether your event was relevant, professional, and, ultimately, deserving of their time.

What kind of judgment did guests pass on your event’s marketing? Ask yourself:

MARKETING:

  1. “How many email invitations did we send to each contact?”
  2. “How many days/hours before the live event did we send each invitation?”
  3. “Was our subject line effective? Could we have brainstormed a shorter, clearer, or pluckier one?”
  4. “Was the invitation relevant to recipients and did it accurately describe and properly weight the items in our presentation?”
  5. “Could the marketing copy have conveyed the same information in fewer words or with greater specificity and appeal?”
  6. “Was the email invitation easy to read and attractive?”
  7. “Did we send (enough) timely reminders to registrants?”

PRODUCTION:

Your answers to these questions will help you determine whether your webinar marketing could improve its appearance, message, timeliness, and helpfulness.

Most of us have cringed when a microphone blared with feedback during a graduation or have sat through a school play where the kids hadn’t really rehearsed their lines. Your webinar event is live just like those and it’s just as capable of having audio problems or appearing unready—except your audience has no family in the show and has no qualm about leaving early.

How professionally produced was your event? Ask yourself:

  1. “Could our attendees clearly listen to our webinar by phone and over the Internet?”
  2. “Did our conference line chime every time someone joined or left? Did we keep our attendance numbers private?”
  3. “Could our attendees easily find a help line to call us if there was a problem?”
  4. “Were the presenters at ease with their presentation, stumbling and uncertain, or reading from a script (while audibly shuffling papers)?”
  5. “Did we properly encourage attendees to participate in poll questions and give them enough time do so?”
  6. “Did we have a dedicated ‘chatter’ (or two or three) to proactively chat with attendees and promptly reply?”
  7. “Was there a backup plan (or two) in case we had technical problems?”

Bottom line: You want to take every measure you can so your audience has a high-quality experience.

SUBSTANCE:

Generally speaking, from the attendees’ perspective, the best webinars leave them better able to perform their jobs. Within the genre of educational presentations—sorry, leave out the slapstick and melodrama—you can have dull, scattershot, impractical, irrelevant content or insightful, topical, timely, engaging content. While your presentation may be a mix, it will ideally fall entirely into the second category.

Ask yourself these questions to see how yours faired:

  1. “How many anecdotes or stories did our presentation include?”
  2. “How many case studies and real-world examples did our presentation include?”
  3. “Have we given attendees practical information they can apply directly to their day-to-day work?”
  4. “Was our presenter boring himself or herself at any point during the webinar?”
  5. “Did our presentation give the big picture and context as well as the details?”
  6. “Did the presentation have a terrific introduction (hook) and powerful conclusion?”
  7. “Was this presentation given in a manner that was easiest for the presenter to give or in a way that enabled the audience to best understand and remember the material?”

All of these questions will help you assess the quality of the presentation from the viewers’ standpoint—the one that matters most.

SLIDES

Every webinar has the obligatory PowerPoint slides, which many presenters seemingly create with the enthusiasm and care of a teenager stuck washing the dishes. These slides matter. Exemplary slides complement an oral presentation with a visual dimension. They go beyond typing out the script and illustrate key points with graphs, charts, cartoons, pictures, news clippings, screenshots, quotations, art, animations, and more.

With all that in mind, assess your slide deck by asking:

  1. “Do our slides have an attractive template?”
  2. “Do our slides avoid spelling out what the presenter is saying (lest the audience read ahead)?”
  3. “Do each of our slides have no more than 3-5 lines of bullets or text?”
  4. “Have we thought of how to best convey the information in a visual way, via graphs, charts, and with other items, such as those listed above in this article?”
  5. “Have we thoroughly copy edited the slides?”
  6. “Have we added enough formatting elements, such as fonts, colored bullets, and animations, without going overboard?”
  7. “In the end, are our slides pleasing to look at?”

Too many slide presentations repel the eye. Remember the audience will be looking at your slides for 30-60 minutes. If they have the visual appeal of a tax form, your attendees may choose to just listen and go shoe shopping online.

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

Webinars cost your company money and take up marketing’s time. Don’t let your attendees waltz in and leave without providing you with anything in return. Specifically, your webinar marketing and live event team can gather certain guest information to position your salespeople for a successful follow-up campaign.

Ask yourself:

  1. “Did our registration form request the necessary information? Could we have increased registrations by making the form shorter or easier to complete?”
  2. “Did we post a live poll that asked attendees if they would like additional information on the topic?”
  3. “Did the topic of our presentation align with our services or products?”
  4. “Did the presenter spend at least several minutes at the end sharing what kinds of companies benefit from our services or products, and how?”
  5. “Were attendees asked to submit feedback and (quickly) directed to an exit survey?”
  6. “Have we collected the live webinar chats for our salespeople to see who had what concerns?”

Webinars do give away expert advice, but they are no charity event. Make sure your team has taken the requisite steps so your sales team can do its job well.

How Did You Do?

Many people want an assessment grade. “Give it to me straight, Doc.” Some questions have right answers: Was your audio quality good? Did you send at least one event reminder? Most of the questions have no right answer. Every company has different goals and different audiences.

If you aren’t satisfied with your answers, brainstorm ways or seek out advice on how to get the answers you want. If you are happy with how you did, consider experimenting or conducting A/B tests to see how you might improve.

In the end, the questions serve as a guide. You have to respond to the questions and decide whether you are happy with the results or want better.

A Webinar Self Assessment Guide

March 19th, 2018 Posted by Articles 0 thoughts on “A Webinar Self Assessment Guide”

ADDITIONAL
CONTENT

We provide the best webinar platform and webinar hosting services.
Our clients receive the best webinar project management, webinar preparation,
webinar technology, and webinar production services on the market.

CLICK HERE FOR A FREE CONSULTATION

A WEBINAR SELF ASSESSMENT GUIDE

You want to know how good your webinar was. After all, an audience that your company wants to impress just saw it. While the dozens or hundreds of attendees couldn’t see how well the speaker was dressed, they were definitely evaluating certain aspects of your live event.

From the audience’s perspective: How engaging was the content? Was there superior audio quality? Did the visuals complement the presentation? From an internal perspective: How well did you market the webinar? Is your firm ready to follow up with each registrant?

These sorts of questions fall nicely into five categories. Answer the questions in each of the categories below for a sense of where your events sparkle and where they need some shine.

Your event impressed guests one way or the other before it ever started. How the webinar invitations looked, what they said, and when they were sent gave invited guests the material they needed to judge whether your event was relevant, professional, and, ultimately, deserving of their time.

What kind of judgment did guests pass on your event’s marketing? Ask yourself:

MARKETING:

  1. “How many email invitations did we send to each contact?”
  2. “How many days/hours before the live event did we send each invitation?”
  3. “Was our subject line effective? Could we have brainstormed a shorter, clearer, or pluckier one?”
  4. “Was the invitation relevant to recipients and did it accurately describe and properly weight the items in our presentation?”
  5. “Could the marketing copy have conveyed the same information in fewer words or with greater specificity and appeal?”
  6. “Was the email invitation easy to read and attractive?”
  7. “Did we send (enough) timely reminders to registrants?”

PRODUCTION:

Your answers to these questions will help you determine whether your webinar marketing could improve its appearance, message, timeliness, and helpfulness.

Most of us have cringed when a microphone blared with feedback during a graduation or have sat through a school play where the kids hadn’t really rehearsed their lines. Your webinar event is live just like those and it’s just as capable of having audio problems or appearing unready—except your audience has no family in the show and has no qualm about leaving early.

How professionally produced was your event? Ask yourself:

  1. “Could our attendees clearly listen to our webinar by phone and over the Internet?”
  2. “Did our conference line chime every time someone joined or left? Did we keep our attendance numbers private?”
  3. “Could our attendees easily find a help line to call us if there was a problem?”
  4. “Were the presenters at ease with their presentation, stumbling and uncertain, or reading from a script (while audibly shuffling papers)?”
  5. “Did we properly encourage attendees to participate in poll questions and give them enough time do so?”
  6. “Did we have a dedicated ‘chatter’ (or two or three) to proactively chat with attendees and promptly reply?”
  7. “Was there a backup plan (or two) in case we had technical problems?”

Bottom line: You want to take every measure you can so your audience has a high-quality experience.

SUBSTANCE:

Generally speaking, from the attendees’ perspective, the best webinars leave them better able to perform their jobs. Within the genre of educational presentations—sorry, leave out the slapstick and melodrama—you can have dull, scattershot, impractical, irrelevant content or insightful, topical, timely, engaging content. While your presentation may be a mix, it will ideally fall entirely into the second category.

Ask yourself these questions to see how yours faired:

  1. “How many anecdotes or stories did our presentation include?”
  2. “How many case studies and real-world examples did our presentation include?”
  3. “Have we given attendees practical information they can apply directly to their day-to-day work?”
  4. “Was our presenter boring himself or herself at any point during the webinar?”
  5. “Did our presentation give the big picture and context as well as the details?”
  6. “Did the presentation have a terrific introduction (hook) and powerful conclusion?”
  7. “Was this presentation given in a manner that was easiest for the presenter to give or in a way that enabled the audience to best understand and remember the material?”

All of these questions will help you assess the quality of the presentation from the viewers’ standpoint—the one that matters most.

SLIDES

Every webinar has the obligatory PowerPoint slides, which many presenters seemingly create with the enthusiasm and care of a teenager stuck washing the dishes. These slides matter. Exemplary slides complement an oral presentation with a visual dimension. They go beyond typing out the script and illustrate key points with graphs, charts, cartoons, pictures, news clippings, screenshots, quotations, art, animations, and more.

With all that in mind, assess your slide deck by asking:

  1. “Do our slides have an attractive template?”
  2. “Do our slides avoid spelling out what the presenter is saying (lest the audience read ahead)?”
  3. “Do each of our slides have no more than 3-5 lines of bullets or text?”
  4. “Have we thought of how to best convey the information in a visual way, via graphs, charts, and with other items, such as those listed above in this article?”
  5. “Have we thoroughly copy edited the slides?”
  6. “Have we added enough formatting elements, such as fonts, colored bullets, and animations, without going overboard?”
  7. “In the end, are our slides pleasing to look at?”

Too many slide presentations repel the eye. Remember the audience will be looking at your slides for 30-60 minutes. If they have the visual appeal of a tax form, your attendees may choose to just listen and go shoe shopping online.

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

Webinars cost your company money and take up marketing’s time. Don’t let your attendees waltz in and leave without providing you with anything in return. Specifically, your webinar marketing and live event team can gather certain guest information to position your salespeople for a successful follow-up campaign.

Ask yourself:

  1. “Did our registration form request the necessary information? Could we have increased registrations by making the form shorter or easier to complete?”
  2. “Did we post a live poll that asked attendees if they would like additional information on the topic?”
  3. “Did the topic of our presentation align with our services or products?”
  4. “Did the presenter spend at least several minutes at the end sharing what kinds of companies benefit from our services or products, and how?”
  5. “Were attendees asked to submit feedback and (quickly) directed to an exit survey?”
  6. “Have we collected the live webinar chats for our salespeople to see who had what concerns?”

Webinars do give away expert advice, but they are no charity event. Make sure your team has taken the requisite steps so your sales team can do its job well.

How Did You Do?

Many people want an assessment grade. “Give it to me straight, Doc.” Some questions have right answers: Was your audio quality good? Did you send at least one event reminder? Most of the questions have no right answer. Every company has different goals and different audiences.

If you aren’t satisfied with your answers, brainstorm ways or seek out advice on how to get the answers you want. If you are happy with how you did, consider experimenting or conducting A/B tests to see how you might improve.

In the end, the questions serve as a guide. You have to respond to the questions and decide whether you are happy with the results or want better.

Generating fortune 1000 leads with events

February 26th, 2018 Posted by Articles 0 thoughts on “Generating fortune 1000 leads with events”

ADDITIONAL
CONTENT

We provide the best webinar platform and webinar hosting services.
Our clients receive the best webinar project management, webinar preparation,
webinar technology, and webinar production services on the market.

CLICK HERE FOR A FREE CONSULTATION

GENERATING FORTUNE 1000 LEADS WITH EVENTS

On any given day, executives from Rolls Royce, Paramount Pictures or Walgreens are talking with the General Managers (GMs) of one enterprise software company. It’s one of the largest such companies in the world and its GMs are navigating tricky waters. They have to keep executives at such renowned companies happy and create product development roadmaps that keep them loyal.

How do you communicate a roadmap to customers? How do you win their support? How do you generate leads for the new offerings?

The cadre of GMs who manage the dozens of enterprise software solutions chose quarterly user webinars as the answer. And they wanted to run those events without using any internal resources, and wanted to create the presentations using a minimum of their own time.

SUSTAINABLE CONTENT

The first hurdle the GMs and Rally Point faced was creating content that would draw customers each quarter and that the GMs could manageably create each quarter.

Presentations filled with such gobbledygook words as “cutting-edge,” “innovation” and “turnkey” wouldn’t do. Instead, each presentation began with a mix of good and frustrated quotes from customers. The quotes captured the customers’ perspective, dismissed any notions of sugarcoating, and enabled the GMs to effectively talk about the specific items—bug fixes, new features, tech support transitions, etc.—that affected customers’ success that quarter.

The product development roadmap section let the GMs reveal the latest whiz-bang features and key material. It also let them share case studies, demos, and customer stories that created immediate, practical value for the attendees. As a finale, attendees were rewarded with special product and support offers.

The format of the events stayed the same. The GMs could plug the quarter’s information into each presentation in an afternoon or two and have a presentation ready to go.

YES, NO, MAYBE

Before implementing the webinars, the GMs often had no conclusive data as to how customers felt about an initiative, offer, or idea. Webinar polls provided the sound information they wanted.

According to one GM, “One of the biggest benefits of the presentations is that I can see what customers approve of. I usually have an idea of how popular an idea is and where each person stands. But the events let me know who thinks what. And, afterwards, I can run with an idea or go back to the drawing board.”

Each presentation asks four to six poll questions. For key questions such as “Are you receiving the value you expected from this product?”, attendees can vote “yes” or “no”. The GMs know exactly where each customer stands.

For cross-selling and upselling, lead generation questions such as, “Do the new features of version 2011 excite you?” allow attendees to select, “yes,” “no” or “maybe.” Account managers know to give the “maybes” particular attention to put them in the “yes” column.

The polls also play a key role in winning customer support. The GM can outline a product roadmap and ask “Do you agree that this is the direction we should be moving in?” With 80-95% of attendees often agreeing, the GMs can broadcast the results and have everyone know there’s a popular tide moving with them.

To make follow-up activities straightforward, each of the GMs and their account management teams receive a webinar workbook which details the votes of each attendee (as well as the registration and attendance information).

HONING THE LANGUAGE

Each webinar targets a very specific vertical market, such as nuclear submarine engineers, online entrepreneurs and real estate developers; so, the GMs need to pick their language carefully. Each GM has at least one dry run of each event in which Rally Point Webinars makes recommendations on how the GM can cut jargon, simplify the message, tweak poll questions, and clarify what each presentation slide should show.

In example Slide #1, the slide includes the best unhappy quotes to open a conversation on areas for improvement. In example Slide #2, the slide eliminates the details of “Faster” to hammer the main message.

(The dry runs also give the GMs an opportunity to add their personality to the events. One GM had fun by playing “Don’t Stop ’til You Get Enough” during the poll questions—coincidentally those polls had some of the best lead generation response rates.)

Running an Effective Lean Organization

The enterprise software company has in part succeeded by outsourcing many functions outside of its expertise. In this case, that meant the GMs had Rally Point Webinars manage and produce the events. The GMs and their teams focus on the needs of clients like Dunkin Donuts and Hanes, rather than managing the marketing and execution of nearly 100 events, in languages ranging from Finnish to French.

While the GMs outsource event management, Rally Point pours essential knowledge back into the company. By holding a quarterly “lessons learned” event, Rally Point shares best practices with the GMs and showcases highlights from the various presentations. For the GMs who work independently of each other, this provides organization-wide learning that improves their performance and makes their jobs easier.

Keeping It Going

The leads from the events have helped generate millions of dollars and helped the GMs meet their aggressive financial targets. The messaging of the events has helped the GMs communicate with their customers and show the progress of their solutions. With over 20 events lined up for the next quarter, more results will continue to stream in.

*   *   *

By the numbers:

  • Over 20 webinars are produced each quarter;
  • The enterprise software company has had to add zero support staff;
  • The average customer for each enterprise software brand ranges from $15k to $1.25M;
  • Each event generates an average of 6-12 leads that personally request follow-up;
  • The company expected to outsource to several companies (e.g., marketers, event producers, webinar platform providers), but Rally Point consolidated all of those functions.
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